Media


April 7, 2020
Toronto Globe & Mail

Moment In Time
by Brad Wheeler

bruce-circa 1970

The turn of the sixties into the seventies was a time of thoughtfulness and patchouli-scented spirituality, reflected by charting hits that included, in the spring of 1970, Simon & Garfunkel’s Bridge Over Troubled Water and the Beatles’ Let it Be. “Speaking words of wisdom,” then, was something of a genre unto itself. It was in this era that on April 7, 1970, the young Ottawan Bruce Cockburn released a spare, acoustic and introspective self-titled debut album that was at turns gentle and jaunty, marked by flowery lyricism and the lucid, seeking outlook of a self-aware artist on the cusp of something yet unclear. “It’s my turn, but where’s the guide?” the nascent troubadour wondered on Man of a Thousand Faces. The political activism of 1984′s If I Had a Rocket Launcher would come later, as would 13 Juno Awards. In 1970, though, with songs such as Thoughts on a Rainy Afternoon, the gifted musician sought connections behind the things he observed. As for what lay ahead, he was characteristically clear-eyed, singing “Jesus, don’t let tomorrow take my love away.” Cockburn would win that fight.



March 21, 2020
Via email from Bruce

Bruce out for a walk in San Francisco at Tank Hill Park on March 20, 2020.

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February 3, 2020
True North Press Release

Bruce Cockburn Announces 50th Anniversary Shows.

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Is it really fifty years ago that Bruce Cockburn’s first album came out?     

Indeed, it is. His eponymous titled album which included “Going To The Country” and “Musical Friends” was released on April 7, 1970.  Coincidently it was also the first album released by True North records. TN 1 was its catalogue number.     

Although mostly recorded in late 1969 the first album hit the stores and airwaves in 1970 and started the long, long journey that continues to this day.

Here’s what Bruce has to say:

“In 1969, when I was feeling the need to record an album of the songs I’d been writing, I had no concept of what that might lead to. Not unusual for a young person, I guess. In some organic way it felt like it was time. The future wasn’t really an issue. It still isn’t. For each of us, there’s a future or there isn’t. But looking back over the arc of fifty years of recording, performing, and travel, not to mention relationships and personal challenges, I can only shake my head and mutter a word of thanks for all of it. Even if I’d been a planner by nature, I doubt I could have predicted how things have gone. And they’re still going!”

Bruce has now released 34 albums and played thousands of concerts around the world, something that he continues to do to this day.

























© Daniel Keebler 1993-2020